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Adopt an elderly

Adopt an elderly

Image credit: Photo by Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels

By Shubhankar Kulkarni on Oct 23, 2020

Martina Pesce a month ago
Great cool idea!

Since the main objective is to eliminate loneliness (and not just the economical factor) another problem could be that very often if the elder has an actual home, he/she would probably rather not to leave it.
I think it would be cool if this is the case, the adopter actually goes to live with the elder.
It even solves the eventual economical problems of the adopter.
To solve the "the elder may die from one day to another one" problem, it can be decided before they start that the house is gonna be usable by the adopter for X time after the elder death, so the adopter can organize him/her self out.
Shubhankar Kulkarni a month ago
Martina Pesce Yes! I think every adopter and adoptee can have their personalized contract before they start their relationship. There will be a standard draft for such adoptions and other specific items such as the one you pointed out can be added to the draft.
Povilas S a month ago
I think this is a great idea. The main problem I see is that many elders (who would need adoption the most) have physical or more importantly mental dysfunctions and have been placed in elderly care often by their own families. And they won't grow up like kids, they will need care till their death. Also, those elders who are still healthy and clearheaded enough but live alone can develop those conditions later, so there's this kind of responsibility coming with adoption because first adopting and then giving to a retirement home is a bit ironic for lack of a better word.
Shubhankar Kulkarni a month ago
Povilas S Agreed. Do we have any statistics on what percentage of surviving elders end up in assisted healthcare facilities and their age at admission? This will be different for different countries. What I want to know is, if the average age of admission is, say 70, can the lonely elderly still have 10 years to be with a family? It is a significant percentage and may make a difference in the individual's health. It may even increase the age at admission to 75, just by knowing that some family cares for you.
Povilas S a month ago
Shubhankar Kulkarni Some US statistics here: https://nursinghomediaries.com/howmany/

But your approach as I understand would be to let the adopting family freely give the elderly to a nursing home when it would become too much of a burden for them? And simply to value the benefits of increasing the admission age? There would still be a lot of tension concerning the emotional/ethical side of this.

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