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Are we Into the Brave New World of Aldous Huxley ?

Are we Into the Brave New World of Aldous Huxley ?

By Mohammad Shazaib on Sep 12, 2020

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Brave New World : Novel Summary

In the novel Brave New World, Aldous Huxley crafts a future society with a single "World State" governed by a totalitarian regime and a rigid social structure. Each group is taught to be satisfied with their role in society and to distract themselves with consumerism, casual sex, and a drug called soma. The novel follows the story of Bernard Marx and Lenina Crowne. Bernard is an outsider in the society, and has feelings for Lenina, who is very much integrated into the World State society. Together they visit the Savage Reservation in New Mexico, where they find aging, emotion, religious rituals, and family units, all of which are foreign and shocking. They meet John and his mother Linda, both of whom are residents of the reservation, and they all travel back to London. Throughout the novel, the characters living in the World State are constantly consuming. They desire the lavish, and are only being satisfied with the extravagant. They play complicated games such as Obstacle Golf, ride in helicopters, and consume soma in order to maintain a state of contentment. When John confronts Mond about the way of life in the World State, Mond admits that the heads of state do not want citizens to ever be satisfied with what they have, but to always want what is new and to seek enjoyment through the acquirement of new goods. In such a culture, there is a level of complacency reached as citizens are too focused on consumption to ponder deeper questions, seek hard truths, or question the status quo. When this proves insufficient to feel satisfied, they self-medicate with soma, numbing themselves to the world that surrounds them. At the end of the novel, Mond says: “Actual happiness always looks pretty squalid in comparison with the over-compensations for misery. And, of course, stability isn't nearly so spectacular as instability. And being contented has none of the glamour of a good fight against misfortune, none of the picturesqueness of a struggle with temptation, or a fatal overthrow by passion or doubt. Happiness is never grand.” Reference Aldous Huxley : Brave New World

by Mohammad Shazaib on Sep 12, 2020

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