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Can you come up with a formula for calculating the value of an idea?

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Darko Savic
Darko Savic May 08, 2022
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Necessity

Is the problem still unsolved?

Conciseness

Is it concisely described?

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Can you come up with a formula or principles by which we can realistically calculate the value of an idea?
Derek Sivers once came up with such a formula that rates an idea on a scale between 1-6 where the maximum value could be $20.
Can you come up with a better way of assigning value to ideas? Ideally, such that it can be done by people on this platform.
12
Creative contributions

Factors that play a role in determining the value of an idea

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Darko Savic
Darko Savic May 08, 2022
We could consider the following factors:
  • Originality; Is it drastically different from similar solutions?
  • Necessity; Is it targeting an unsolved problem?
  • Audience; How many people would appreciate the underlying problem being solved for them?
  • Feasibility; Is the idea feasible?
  • Conciseness; Is it described concisely or is the noise to signal ratio too high (difficult to read)?
  • What else could play a role?
Each of the above could be rated between 1-10. Each has a different weight in the total score/value of an idea. For example:
  • Necessity: $10 if it targets an unsolved problem. $5 if the problem is poorly solved with existing solutions. $1 if the problem already has good solutions out there.
  • Audience: $100 if it helps a billion people, $1 if it helps one person.
  • Conciseness: $5 if it's concisely described, -$5 if it wastes people's time.
  • Feasibility: $1 if the idea is feasible, $0 if it's not.
  • Originality: $2 if the idea is original, $0 if it's not.
Then the formula could look something like this:
(necessity + audience) * feasibility * originality + conciseness
So a great, unique idea that solves an unsolved problem for 300 Million people and is concisely descrbed would be worth:
(10 + 30) * 1 * 2 + 5 = $85
In contrast, a non-original idea that solves a problem that's already well solved with other solutions, is written so that it's a waste of time to read would be:
(1 + 30) * 0 * 0 - 5 = -$5
Woever wrote it, theoretically owes you 5 bucks for wasting your time on reading the idea. It should have been a "pay per read" marketing campaign instead.
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Patrick Skinner (21/100)
Patrick Skinner (21/100)a year ago
The idea is the RATE(r) of an exponential growth formula.
Execution is the Exponent (x).
Initial support behind the idea (RATE) is "a."
a(1 + r)^x
The idea is propped up by its support (a), no matter how mad the idea is, and grown through the exponent of execution.
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Shireesh Apte
Shireesh Apte2 years ago
Assuming that the idea can be made into a product that can be sold - calculate the ratio of the custormer acquisition cost to the revenue. The larger the ratio, the lesser the idea is worth because you have to 'educate' the people into buying the product. The lesser the ratio, the more the idea is worth because the product is so good at solving a problem that there is essentially no need to 'educate' the customer. This method will provide real metrics to an idea's worth.
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Shubhankar Kulkarni
Shubhankar Kulkarni2 years ago
Great formula! The audience score is a bit tricky. If $1 corresponds to one person and $100 to 1 billion, then the curve should be exponential and not linear. To make the formula more accurate, the "audience" score needs to have its own formula. Using the input data as $1 corresponds to 1 person and $100 to 1 billion, the formula would be y = 1 * (e ^ (0.000000005 * x), where y is the amount in $ and x is the number of people or audience. In that case, 300 million may not equate to $30, but much less, not even $10.
Alternatively, if you want the formula to be linear and still want 1$ corresponding to 1 person and 100$ corresponding to 1 billion, what you can do is split the formula for the "audience" score into two parts using a threshold. The first part could be non-linear and arbitrary, and the second could be linear. If there are zero people benefitting from the idea, the "audience" score is zero. If there is one person benefitting from the idea, the "audience score" will be $1. If there are at least 2 and at the max 1000 people benefitting from the idea, the "audience score" will be $1.2. If there are at least 1001 people and at the max 1 million people benefitting from the idea, the "audience score" will be $1.4. For 1 million to 10 million people, the "audience score" will be $1.6. For up to 20 million people, the score will be $2. After that, you could use a linear equation and every 10 million people who benefitted could increase the score by $1.
This will be mentioned on the idea evaluation page to maintain transparency.
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new factors to your model

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Mikhail Korsanov
Mikhail Korsanov May 08, 2022
Darko, I would add:
  • pleasure from reading the idea: how many people experience what level of positive feelings, reading the idea description N*P, where N and P ={1...10}
  • evaluated economical effect
  • absence of negative side effects for the users and others
  • how well it is elaborated in details,
  • obstacles foreseen or not
  • obstacles overcome or only foreseen
  • how easy it is for understanding
  • how fast it is for implementation
  • implementation costs per piece
  • start-up implementation costs
  • if it is nature-friendly
  • if it is cruelty free/animals friendly
  • if it is otherwise ethical
  • if it requires rare resources, which makes supply risky
For each factor I would set a factor weight reflecting its significance for the total value.
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J. Nikola
J. Nikola2 years ago
I think most of the points are great, but pleasure from reading could be a product of creative writing rather than the greatness of the idea. It could also happen that I, as a biologist, consider the mechanical idea to be awesome, while an engineer will know it's low-hanging fruit and has no value. But, as I mentioned, the rest of the points are valid!
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Mikhail Korsanov
Mikhail Korsanova year ago
J. Nikola Pleasure from reading improves loyality of the audience to the brainstorming.com site, and improves life quality of the reader. We enjoy ideas very far from reality in the fiction books, and value them not because of their close feasibility, but because we love getting them to know. Reading unrealistic but pleasing and shockingly interesting idea may be valuable because it may stimulate coming up a new realizable idea. Alternatively, it may motivate people to think how to make an unrealistic idea closer to reality. Many good things started from a dream.
Yes, pleasure from reading may be both because of the wording and because the idea is brilliant (even though unrealistic). Fun wording may be useful as well, because it motivates to remember the idea and think of it more.
So, I would let this criterion have some weight.
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Shubhankar Kulkarni
Shubhankar Kulkarni2 years ago
Great! Definitely factor in its impact on nature.
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Succes(s) criteria

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JD
Joris van Dooren Jun 09, 2022
Rate the idea from 1-10 on six criteria: simple, unexpected, concrete, credible, emotional, storyful. Add the scores to get the final score.
These criteria come form Made to stick by Dan an Chip Heath and have been practically tested in higher education in our dutch university. It works.
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Darko Savic
Darko Savica year ago
This is how we currently rate ideas:

From your list, I draw some similarities with the way we currently do it:
  • conciseness = simple, concrete
  • feasible = concrete, credible
  • original = unexpected (in a way). The definition of an invention is a solution that is new and non-obvious.
I can imagine the preference for "storyful" would be useful in the future marketability of the solution. Why emotional? Same reason - future marketability? Because emotion-eliciting stories have the potential to go viral?
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Popular opinions

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Spook Louw
Spook Louw Jun 09, 2022
I think the current system for rating ideas on Brainstorming is probably the best way to approach it. Perhaps it can be made more accurate by adding more criteria like the factors listed by Mikhail Korsanov.
I don't think a universal formula would really be feasible because of the level of subjectivity to many of the factors. Therefore, I think a rating system remains a better option than a set formula.
Perhaps we can find a way to allow users to do a simple upvote, only requiring them to press "like" once, but also giving them the option to do an in-depth rating, consisting of an exhaustive range of criteria, which can be used to determine the value of an idea.
Other factors I would include:
  • The theoretic price a reader would be willing to pay for an idea.
  • How many potential problems have been addressed in the original idea description
  • Bonus points if it addresses something that is currently trending or popular (timing can also be an important factor in the success of an idea.
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Formula based on opinion polls + certain necessary parameters

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Shubhankar Kulkarni
Shubhankar Kulkarni Jun 09, 2022
We let people decide the value of most things (movies, products, etc.) because they are the ultimate users. Why not let the users have a say in the value of an idea? Prepare a form with the following questions and make it viral. Attach a small incentive to it to motivate more users. There are websites that pay users to answer survey questions. You can explore those, too.
The question you need to include:
  1. Were you looking for a solution to the problem that the current idea solves?
Once you get responses, you can start analyzing:
  1. Calculate the number of people interested in using your idea (indicated by "c" in the formula below).
  2. Calculate the total number of responses you get (indicated by "pop" in the formula below).
Now, there are certain other parameters that the idea needs to fulfill. These come from experts in the field (As J. Nikola mentioned):
  1. Necessity: The panel of experts rates the idea for its necessity in the current scenario. They give a score out of 1. A score of 1 indicates necessity and a score of zero indicates no necessity or that an alternative better solution exists. The average score is considered (indicated by "np" in the formula).
  2. Conciseness: The panel of experts rates the idea for conciseness. They give a score out of 10. Extremely concise equals 1; extremely lengthy to the point that very few read it equals 10. The average score of the panel is considered.
  3. Feasibility: Feasibility is scored in terms of the number of years it will take to realize (bring it to market) the idea. A score of 100 indicates that the idea is realizable within a year. For each extra year the idea takes to realize, the feasibility decreases exponentially.
  4. Originality: Originality is binary, it can be either "yes" or "no". This is decided by the panel of experts. If the idea is original, it gets a score of one, else a zero.
  5. Complexity: If the usage of the idea is too complex to understand and perform, few will be able to use it. Others might come up with a better and easy alternative to it. If the idea is least complex, the score is 1; if the idea is maximally complex, the score is 10.
Value of your idea (in $) = ((c + (np*pop)) * feasibility * originality) / (2 * pop * complexity * conciseness)
Therefore, if the idea is original, concise, least complex, feasible within a year, 100 out of 100 responders vote to use it, and the expert panel gives it a necessity score of 1,
The value of the idea is = ((100 + (1 * 100)) * 100 * 1) / (2 * 100 * 1 * 1) = $100.
This is the best score an idea can get. The score decreases hereafter for every fault.
Explaining the formula: The essence of an idea is that it needs to be new, not thought of before. If there is no originality, it may not be considered an idea, it is simply a useful product. Therefore, if the idea is not original, its value will be zero according to the above formula. Both, the expert panel and the consumer need to decide the necessity. Hence, necessity is the average of the score given by the panel and the number of people interested in using the idea.
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J. Nikola
J. Nikolaa year ago
Great idea! Would you consider an idea original if it's just an original application of an existing procedure, device, or method?
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Shubhankar Kulkarni
Shubhankar Kulkarnia year ago
J. Nikola Thank you! Yes, I would. It would be analogus to a utility patent.
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Simplifying my formula - excluding opinion polls and expert panel

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Shubhankar Kulkarni
Shubhankar Kulkarni Jun 09, 2022
I am trying to simplify my original formula, which is explained in this contribution.
My original formula was this:
Value of your idea (in $) = ((c + (np*pop)) * feasibility * originality) / (2 * pop * complexity * conciseness)
I plan to exclude opinion polls and the expert panel for simplicity. Now, the people who read an idea and vote for it will be the expert panel as well as the responders in the opinion poll.
The readers will rate the idea using the following parameters. Each parameter can have a scroll bar or an input box, which the users can fill.
  1. Necessity: A score between zero and 1 (using decimal point). A score of 1 indicates that the idea is necessary.
  2. Conciseness: A score between 1 and 10. Extremely concise equals 1; extremely lengthy to the point that very few read it equals 10. The average score is considered.
  3. Feasibility: Feasibility is scored in terms of the number of years it will take to realize (bring it to market) the idea. A score of 100 indicates that the idea is immediately realizable.
  4. Originality: Originality is binary, it can be either "yes" or "no". If the idea is original, it gets a score of one, else a zero.
  5. Complexity: If the usage of the idea is too complex to understand and perform, few will be able to use it. Others might come up with a better and easy alternative to it. If the idea is least complex, the score is 1; if the idea is maximally complex, the score is 10.
The average of the readers' scores is calculated for each of these parameters. The new simplified formula is:
Value of your idea (in $) = (necessity * feasibility * originality) / (complexity * conciseness)
Therefore, if the idea is original, concise, least complex, feasible within a year, and necessary,
The value of the idea is = (1 * 100 * 1) / (1 * 1) = $100.
This is the best score an idea can get. The score decreases hereafter for every fault.
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Marco Agudelo
Marco Agudeloa year ago
would you please try to draw it? You are covering end values but it would be great to comprehend the continuity of the equation. It would be a five independent variables right?
for example if conciseness, feasibility and necessity are in such different scales ( [1-10], [1-100], [0-1]) that could introduce bias to the formula making it too sensible to one variable rather than others and if so, which of those five proposed measures would be worthy to lead the output?
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Marco Agudelo
Marco Agudeloa year ago
Shubhankar Kulkarni
Experience on previous work for this challenge, the group found five major concepts to be considered, their are:
G=x1, x2, x3, x4,, x5 : x1, x2, x3, x4, x5
X1 : Necessity,
X2 : conciseness,
X3 : feasibility,
X4 : originality,
X5 : complexity.
Let's consider that the elements of G must have units. And the formula used must be congruent with those units. If this is not complied with, then the formula lacks structure.
So we have the value of an idea in dollars for simplicity. In such consideration let's suppose that:
x1 and x3 are in dollars units, then if the formula is a multiple of the variables one will end with dollars square or dimensionless, that is:
if xi, xj are dollartype variables f(G)=f1(G)*f2(G) non congruent unit for value.
so f(G) = sum( f1(G), f2(G), ... , fn(G)) to be congruent with units
If one will include a multiplication type formula at least should be odd number of concepts valued to dollars. So let us suppose a second group X that included concepts values of G that are rated with dollar units, this is:
X={xi, xj, ... , xk} | #{X} must be odd and #{G}=n ; #{X} is the cardinal of X, which counts how many elements have X. so if G is five elements long like in our example X can be 1, 3, 5. This is one, three or five concepts that can be valued as money.
On how to include an average of the users valuation due to the complexity of defining. Here are two subjects.
  1. We could use a third party standard to define, for example as long as all users of the formula have accepted the definition. Here is like a checkbox agreement thing. I remark the importance of being in accordance with units and definitions.
  2. We could use an average weighted regulator for each parameter in order to normalize the equation and reduce bias on the formula; Bias in a formula is a characteristic that tends to dominate the result value. Later on the contribution will explain the method to get the average weighted regulator and it uses.
So considering the fact of multiplying their values and the use of average weighted parameter one could rewrite the formula as:

F1 is a development cost consisting of added values penalized by the group overall comprehension and valuation of the idea and F2 is a million dollar market value.
Let's explain this:
WA(xi) -> R⁺ [0-1] weighted average regulators have values in the real domain between zero and one. They are estimated as the total sum of users' valuation divided by total users times the maximum value of the selected concept. This is:

The F1 part of the equation (the sum part) will be considered the development cost of the idea based on a sum of rank values penalized by the group overall comprehension of each concept. Because the weighted average factors are unique to each idea, each formula will generate its natural bias considering the selected concepts to value it; which I found very interesting for this to happen.
See that concepts considered on the equation can increase at will, this will complicate the model further more so one will expect a higher value to that idea to take in such a problem of including more variables.
Then comes the F2 part of the equation, the product factor, considering the product of all weighted average variables the F(G) function must be in millions of dollars in order to compensate. So that F(G) function must be an investor point of view of the idea, which through a further complex model can determine the market value of the idea. And so, how much they are willing to invest.
In this sense small market ideas can be valued with fewer concepts in sake of simplicity, with small market value. In contrast huge ideas could include further concepts to be considered, weighted and compensate for their possible millions of dollars market value.

[1]https://writingcenter.gmu.edu/guides/writing-concisely#:~:text=To%20Write%20More%20Concisely%2C%20Follow%20These%20Suggestions%3A&text=Read%20each%20paragraph%20aloud.,unnecessary%20%E2%80%9Cto%20be%E2%80%9D%20verbs

[2]https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/conciseness-handout/

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Marco Agudelo
Marco Agudeloa year ago
Shubhankar Kulkarni Thank you for your feedback. You suggest great ideas to comment about. Let’s work them out.
About the dimensionality and arbitrary values (ratios) on the equation
Mathematics above definitions is a language, in which ideas are reflected as can be expressed on your natal tongue or mine, and we are currently sharing those in the English language for the sake of comprehension. Language uses laws in order to be effective as an instrument of thought. Those laws allow a third party to look over even years ahead and comprehend or detail what was missing and continue working on the idea.
One could say that if allowed an arbitrary value that later will be compound, we can conclude than can be possible also to avoid all the trouble of formulating the value in the first place, leave the commercial value as a criteria of its own to who deducted the idea and leave to market to buy or not.
Being conscient about the units of the formula may allow us to create a first model in which the price is static, and continue working to introduce the “time value of money” concept, so we could derive a formula that includes time to mature the value of an idea. And the units will be something like “dollars in years time”, so a prepared investor may buy based on market analysis and so generate earnings from the bought idea. This is totally another chapter and we can inspire on history like black-scholes formula for financial market analysis.
Around 1850 George Boole wrote on the first thirty pages of his book “An investigation of the laws of thought, in which are founded the mathematical theories of logic and probabilities” , a mathematical reflection to establish the Zeros and Ones well nowadays known as bool logic. Being recommended the lecture, to keep it short and giving my interpretation he suggested that the mathematical expression “X times Y, that is X*Y” may represent the idea “rivers that are estuaries” and so indifferently Y*X will represent “estuaries that are rivers” which in ordinary language means the same thing. And if in the event that X and Y represent the same meaning, that could be for example “rivers that are rivers” would be the same as “rivers”. That would be “the square of X is equal to X”, and that property holded in an equation will be satisfied by zero and one only.
About the users equality on valuing the idea.
I think about two models for the weighted average (WA for short). Supposed “prefered users” vote first. This will create first values for WA of each variable, but at the same time will generate a final result, a proposed value of the idea. When “non prefered users” vote for the idea those WA will already been with a BIAS created by “prefered users”, and in this sense there will be no user equality but, if all created values of WA are iterated per each voted user, all estimated values will be updates each time a new user votes the idea.
For example:
To maintain as an example we will use these two assumptions (1) only two variables will be used And (2) both variables are 0 to 10 valuable.
We will keep in mind that the selected variables are five, that there can be more than five as needed and that Limit values are subject to adjustment as well.
User00 votes X1=7 and X2=8, User01 votes X1=6 and X2=8, …, user0n votes X1=4 and X2=7.

Model with preferred users:
With this model the new users that vote will be affected by prior voters only.
Model with non preferential voting:
With this model all voters affect the history and tendency of the proposed value.
Once selected the prefered model with all estimated values there could be a final average or normal distribution, etc.
About the market value brought into the equation due to the summation and/or multiplication of values
I would start by commenting on the subject of why is a summation of things upon the multiplication that may offer a better understanding of the “independent” criterias selected to value an idea.
Variables in general terms are regulated by a series of parameters that are reduced to the coefficient of the variable. Let's suppose a1*X1 and because of that series of parameters the named variable can has infinite curves that represents the conditions of the particular experiment:
In the other hand let's suppose that a variable Z can be interpreted as the product of X and Y, that is Z=X*Y then X and Y are not independent variables and there is a third characteristic Z that enclose both X and Y, so one will prefer to use Z over X and Y in order to maintain independence of the graded values. For example suppose one variable is length other is Area, but Area is length times high (for square obviously). It would be better to use both independent variables in “distance” units to compare them and their product square “distance” units would represent a totally different idea which is the Area rather than a “distance” linear concept.
This is why in the first place I suggested the model as a summation of those five identified key parameters to value an idea. After doing the math one arrives at the expression suggested.
Value of an idea = development cost + market value
About the market value of the equation it arrives during the construction process, one start by adding those independent variables and following the idea of last paragraph one wishes to introduce that Z characteristic, but in this escenario Z is a function of the five selected variables, each with their coefficient, this is:

F(G) gets higher per each new WA included on the model, so in five variables F(G) is in million worth to maintain a usable value. And that association by multiplication of the five criterias to value the idea will create an unknown characteristic to which I named “market value”, so that the “money” units remain consistent.

[1]https://www.cantorsparadise.com/the-black-scholes-formula-explained-9e05b7865d8a

[2]https://www.mathworks.com/help/symbolic/the-black-scholes-formula-for-call-option-price.html

[3]https://brilliant.org/wiki/black-scholes-merton/

[4]https://www.math.cuhk.edu.hk/~rchan/teaching/math4210/chap08.pdf

[5]George Boole, November 1853; An investigation of the laws of thought, on which are founded the mathematical theories of logic and probabilities. https://www.gutenberg.org/files/15114/15114-pdf.pdf

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Adding "price" of the idea to my original formula

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Shubhankar Kulkarni
Shubhankar Kulkarni Jun 09, 2022
My original formula was this:
Value of your idea (in $) = ((c + (np*pop)) * feasibility * originality) / (2 * pop * complexity * conciseness)
I plan to add the price of an idea from the user's point of view.
The questions you need to include in the opinion poll are:
  1. Were you looking for a solution to the problem that the current idea solves?
  2. How much will you pay for it?
Once you get responses, you can start analyzing:
  1. Calculate the number of people interested in using your idea (indicated by "c" in the formula below).
  2. Calculate the average expected price of the product (indicated by "p" in the formula).
  3. Calculate the total number of responses you get (indicated by "pop" in the formula below).
Now, there are certain other parameters that the idea needs to fulfill. I have explained them in my original idea.
Value of your idea (in $) = ((c + (np*pop)) * p * feasibility * originality) / (2 * pop * complexity * conciseness)
Therefore, if the idea is original, concise, least complex, feasible within a year, 100 out of 100 responders vote to use it, the price of the idea product is $100, and the expert panel deems it necessary,
The value of the idea is = ((100 + (1 * 100)) * 100 * 100 * 1) / (2 * 100 * 1 * 1) = $10,000.
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Law of numbers

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J. Nikola
J. Nikola Jun 09, 2022
As Shubhankar Kulkarni proposed, send a poll to thousands of people with the question "How much is this idea worth?". For this, each idea should have a small "highlights" version, or a graphical abstract.
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The Cost of verification

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John Otoko
John Otoko Jun 09, 2022
Evaluating the value of an idea is a form of art: every single person will judge it differently based on their own bias point of view. So the main factor to take into consideration is the cost to test and prove that the idea is feasible... (cost in term of time and money)
Any other aspect as : Impact, originlality, public opinion... are highly biased and non scientific Equation: Value of an idea = minimum value of any idea + (Max vlaue of an idea * Costtoprove )
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John Otoko
John Otokoa year ago
Cost to prove is an index (between 0 and 1) : 0 = impossible to prove that the idea is viable, 1 = idea is already proven minimum value of an idea : community based minimum value of an idea in $ (can be equal to 0) maximum value of an idea: community based maximum value of an idea in $ (the maximum value of an idea will make it worthy for professionnaals to use the platform...) a lot of other criteria have been left behind because they are not scientific enough , for example: Public opinion : public opinion is a way to drawn experts opinion... Impact : any body can "scale up" the impact of any idea by sayin " apply it to the whole world" !! Originality: in fact originality is just a measure of our ignorance not a real value of an idea. Complexity and feasability : they are nested in the index of provability the equation must remain simple and scientific so the cost of the experiment to prove that the iddea is realistic is the main factor to evaluate an idea : multiply it by a number betwwen minimum value of a idea and the maximum the we can realisticly put on the table to attract expert.
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Value of an idea depends not only from the idea

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Mikhail Korsanov
Mikhail Korsanov May 08, 2022
You cannot set a specific value for each idea, because its value depends on context, not only the very idea itself. A negligently small idea may be of an extremely high value in some circumstances, and vice versa: a great idea how to change the world may have no value in a society that is not ready for this change. Do you mean some statistically average value recognized by society to set a price?
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Darko Savic
Darko Savic2 years ago
I was thinking about something like this for example
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Everything mentioned will work if the field experts are judging

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J. Nikola
J. Nikola Jun 09, 2022
Not all ideas are great, but they are all worth a shot. Presenting innovative biotechnological ideas to a bunch of programmers could sound like a miracle in the making, while an average biology student could understand how non-innovative, unfeasible or inappropriate it is. The same is with contributions. Instead of feeding a person's ego with praising comments from the general public, an expert could deliver key contributions to make a good idea brilliant! However, since it's hard to differentiate experts from non-experts and hobbyists, and proper evaluation of the idea is not always a way how to make it brilliant, we need both types of comments to maximize the brainstorming platform goals.
Therefore, what you need for the idea's value to be calculated in the most objective and professional way is primarily a bunch of experts from that specific or other related fields.
To implement it, I would use this contribution as a start. I would find an idea and the experts from related fields. I would then give them a task to rate. The same would be done by the group of people not necessarily related to the field (general public). By comparing these feedbacks, I would bring conclusions if this is a key thing for the proper idea evaluation.
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Mikhail Korsanov
Mikhail Korsanova year ago
Look, in fact if an idea sounds great, and is not great, it still has a value, because it can be fun to read it, and it can inspire someone else's realistic idea or at least give a life motivation, which is valuable by itself.
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Darko Savic
Darko Savica year ago
Mikhail Korsanov but it could also backfire. A reader might think "this site is full of nonsense that's wasting my time, I'm leaving". In contrast, if the content was better filtered to only display original, feasible, necessary, and concisely described ideas the same person might think "wow, this place is one of the most valuable resources online. I better remember/save it and keep checking". In the future, the same reader might eventually contribute something valuable that results in a breakthrough.
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Mikhail Korsanov
Mikhail Korsanova year ago
Darko Savic Why not to let people filter ideas by specific parameters? If you are disappointed by unrealistic ideas, just check the checkbox, so you will not get such. If you enjoy unrealistic mad ideas, come on, uncheck the box, and have fun. Some people may need to find very profitable ideas, others look for high social value, some may need only technological or scientific breakthroughs. Some are keen on finding innovative ideas, others aim at workable ones, no matter, how innovative it is, providing that it is not widely known, etc. Some want to scroll through everything, and others have no time and want only the TOP ones according to the most of criteria. Criteria of the "good" really differ among readers. Let users add new criteria to evaluate ideas with. Some criteria will be more, some less frequently used. Polular criteria go first in the list of estimation, but each idea may have a "tail" of not oftenly used criteria, and possibly rarely estimated. However, you can harness AI to auto-evaluate specific parameters of each idea. This will allow a user to have some preliminary info and filter ideas with some interesting for him parameter. For example, ask GPT-3 like model in natural language: "Find me all innovative ideas around bath, bath equipment, water and washing matters, which are not widely spread" or "Find me ideas which will inspire me."
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why measuring value of an idea?

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Mikhail Korsanov
Mikhail Korsanov Jun 18, 2022
Why would you want to measure value of an idea? The formula depends on this. I would not discriminate any ideas as a whole: all ideas are equally fine. Rather, I would evaluate not the value, but measure of maturity of an idea, closeness to being realized, for example. Not realizable ideas are not bad, rather it's just a feature that determines a different use of the idea than mature ones have.
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Darko Savic
Darko Savica year ago
A good and necessary idea that's not yet ready for execution can be iterated into a feasible plan. In contrast, there's no point iterating or executing a bad idea or even a good one that's not needed.
A good way to measure the value of an idea would enable the person who comes up with it to be fairly rewarded for it.
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Mikhail Korsanov
Mikhail Korsanova year ago
Perhaps, not so much evaluating the overall value of an idea, but its specific features, criteria? For example, how innovative it is, how many people can it affect positively, what economic effect it has etc.
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Shubhankar Kulkarni
Shubhankar Kulkarnia year ago
Mikhail Korsanov "How innovative it is" falls under "originality"; "how many people can it affect" falls under "the number of people who will use"; and "economic effect" falls under the "price of the idea. All these points are taken into consideration.
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General comments

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Spook Louw
Spook Louwa year ago
Do you think the value of an idea needs to be expressed in currency? I think there would be quite a difference between the intrinsic value of an idea as a solution and the monetary worth of an idea. Determining which is the more relevant measurement will determine what type of formula we will be looking at.
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Darko Savic
Darko Savica year ago
Spook Louw we could go for both, a mix of everything
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Darko Savic
Darko Savica year ago
A few hours to go
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Darko Savic
Darko Savic2 years ago
How do we objectively rate ideas in view of their potential impact on the future?
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