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Can we come up with a way to protect children from tech addiction?

Image credit: Kelly Sikkema / unsplash.com

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Darko Savic
Darko Savic Aug 25, 2020
7
Creative contributions

Dress code – 90’s

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Povilas S
Povilas S Aug 27, 2020
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Darko Savic
Darko Savic6 months ago
Simplified, your suggestion is to live a "themed" lifestyle - and pick a theme that doesn't involve addictive tech. Amish take this concept to the extreme. The 90's theme is the closest to our modern way of living while missing the addictive tech component. I would argue that TV is the first addictive tech (even the 80's tv). Before that it was books:)
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Povilas S
Povilas S6 months ago
Yes and also important thing is that virtual reality is interesting, because it's something new, a new experience, but if you lived like a month without at least your smartphone it would also be a new experience, already forgotten, which is also interesting, just requires some guts to do it. About TV - yes of course there were always some alternatives - books, radio, etc., but the difference with TV, as I see it, is that your sight is already trapped in a different place than your physical surroundings, before it the only thing to do that was your imagination.

Printed magazines and DIY kits

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Shubhankar Kulkarni
Shubhankar Kulkarni Aug 25, 2020
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Darko Savic
Darko Savic6 months ago
That's an amazing project/idea. It got me thinking:) I wish the public education system worldwide organized and ran such projects. Students could write for high schoolers, those would write for primary schoolers, those would write for kindergarteners. The goal would be to bring the younger generations up to date on the most interesting aspects of what older generations are currently interested in. With only a few years gap between the generations, each would be able to capture the target audience's interest/attention very well.
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Darko Savic
Darko Savic6 months ago
This might be a project idea worthy of sharing on the platform
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Shubhankar Kulkarni
Shubhankar Kulkarni6 months ago
Yes, please do share! It will also solve the problem of what kind of knowledge and experience companies and job providers expect from you.

Here are some things that may help…

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Jamila
Jamila Aug 25, 2020
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Aohona Datta6 months ago
Interestingly, the last point urges me to focus on my status of tech addiction! If I have to limit screen time in order to prevent my child from picking up the habit, then am I not addicted myself? If that is the case, then, are we even aware of our addiction?
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Shubhankar Kulkarni
Shubhankar Kulkarni6 months ago
This can be a separate brainstorming session.
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Jamila
Jamila 6 months ago
very very true! I guess we don't realise how much we depend on our tech!

No-screen Sundays

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Darko Savic
Darko Savic Aug 31, 2020
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Povilas S
Povilas S6 months ago
I think the more into a game/interesting task you'd turn this (especially for kids, but for everyone), the easier and more natural it will go, otherwise resistance will build up if you simply force it on. So it should be well thought before, how to make it into an interesting thing. Like for example to present a task beforehand, that everyone should come up with ideas what fun could they do without screens, what to play together, where to go, etc. The older generation could show pictures and tell stories of what they used to do when there were no such technology available and that it will be like a leap back in time, etc. In fact the older ones could be the guides in activities (at least at first), cause they have experienced life without screens. Old stuff could be brought from basements and attics to catalyze the interest.
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Darko Savic
Darko Savic6 months ago
I'm trying this out for the next 3 Sundays to see how it goes:)

Reward system: nurturing by entertaining

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Antonio Carusillo
Antonio Carusillo Aug 31, 2020
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Jamila
Jamila 6 months ago
That's a pretty good way to go about it. You're giving them a limit to how much screen time they get, but you are also promoting non-tech stuff by making them work for their screen time. This way they can see what sort of non-tech options are available and they might even like them more :)
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Darko Savic
Darko Savic6 months ago
This could potentially also backfire. On the one side, it teaches the child to invest effort/work into things that matter - which is good. On the other side, it increases the value perception for screen-gadgets. What will happen in situations when the child gets the power to decide? They will likely indulge in everything they were deprived of. A good solution would have to include repetitive teaching on why addictions are bad and how exactly they backfire on a person, how we can be mindful of them, etc.
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Antonio Carusillo
Antonio Carusillo6 months ago
I definitely see your point. My hope, with this method, is that - given enough time - the child by experiencing the “life beyond the screen” will actually start valuing more the other activities than the screen and start seeing cell-phone/table or other techs as a “break time” or a way to improve the other activities ( staying connecting with friends, learn new skills to apply to the “real world” like playing an instrument or just reading for fun). So at this point, the next question is: if you manage to make the child using this system, will the child detach much more easily from the screen and enjoy other activities? Will a certain point the child on is own - when this kind of time-limit is removed - plan is own time? My feeling of gut would be - not surprisingly - that the sooner you adopt such method the easier will be to observe some results. Meaning that if you do not give the time for the addiction to develop, the child will more easily prone to put the tech on the side and use the time for other activities. I think that nevertheless it is important to base it on a “reward system”, so that the cell-phone is given (reward) and not taken away (deprivation). Which is something true, since the child was not born holding a cell phone but it was given in a second moment. Such message should be kept. Of course the reward system should be playful.

Try to minimize without Eradicating

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Mohammad Shazaib
Mohammad Shazaib Aug 31, 2020

Following the age learning curve

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Anja M
Anja M Oct 28, 2020

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General comments

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Darko Savic
Darko Savic6 months ago
Good luck getting our kids out of virtual reality gear once they start liking it more than real life
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Povilas S
Povilas S6 months ago
Yes, and I would add, that kids growing up these days already grow in a mixture of material and virtual realities so they don't even know "real life" in a way that we knew it as kids. VR headsets only put additional dimension to what's essentially already in smartphones and PCs.
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Darko Savic
Darko Savic6 months ago
Agreed. If we are addicted to "low-tech" VR, what will happen when high tech VR is readily available
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Shubhankar Kulkarni
Shubhankar Kulkarni6 months ago
I hope VR does not replace sports. Imagine Neymar hitting a world cup goal from his living room, hooked on to a VR :)